Feature

The Unbearable Wokeness of Being in Stratford

Grant A. Brown
November 29, 2020
Among 2020’s many unfortunate pandemic casualties was the Stratford Festival. Today it’s anybody’s guess how, when or whether the beloved cultural institution, held annually in the Ontario town named for the hometown of William Shakespeare, can restart. But, writes Grant A. Brown, serious wounds were already being inflicted upon the festival – from within. A Stratford resident and business owner, Brown brings a lifelong Shakespeare lover’s perspective to his dissection of the progressive degradation of the great playwright’s greatest works and the garbling of his eternally revealing insights into human nature.
Feature
Among 2020’s many unfortunate pandemic casualties was the Stratford Festival. Today it’s anybody’s guess how, when or whether the beloved cultural institution, held annually in the Ontario town named for the hometown of William Shakespeare, can restart. But, writes Grant A. Brown, serious wounds were already being inflicted upon the festival – from within. A Stratford resident and business owner, Brown brings a lifelong Shakespeare lover’s perspective to his dissection of the progressive degradation of the great playwright’s greatest works and the garbling of his eternally revealing insights into human nature.

Current News

History’s Echoes
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With its bizarre political melange comprising the colourful, the confrontational, the stodgy, the greedy, the eccentric and the unhinged, B.C. often confounds locals as much as outsiders. Could it be the NDP, of all parties, led by a former steakhouse waiter, that cracks that nut, breaks that mold and at last restores a measure of stability and continuity – if of a very big-spending kind? British Columbian Steven Threndyle takes a lively look at B.C.’s recent electoral contest and ventures some predictions about the governing style of a premier who seems more earthy unionist than latte-slurping hipster.
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The woke mob has long gunned for Jordan Peterson. The latest would-be censors are weepy Random House Canada employees who want to stop the sequel to Peterson’s wildly successful 12 Rules for Life. Cockburn, writing in Spectator US, wonders why the Wokesters then seem okay with their employer publishing Hitler and Nietzsche.
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City Journal
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September 2020 Issue

Page 1 | Thirteen Things That Can’t Be Said About Aboriginal Law And Policy In Canada
Page 7 | The WE Charity Scandal: One of Many
Page 14 | Escaping The Echo Chamber
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Page 1 | Thirteen Things That Can’t Be Said About Aboriginal Law And Policy In Canada
Page 7 | The WE Charity Scandal: One of Many
Page 14 | Escaping The Echo Chamber

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Pandemic Comparison
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Stories
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