Current

news & ideas

Urban Transit Using Rural Money

Time was that riding public transit was a tad déclassé, reserved for kids, little old ladies and people who hadn’t quite arrived, or never would. Songs like The Guess Who’s “Bus Rider” depicted its dreariness and repetitiveness. Nowadays, hopping the LRT or subway is cool, a virtuous act signalling environmental wokeness and “moving on” from the automobile. The riding experience, naturellement, needs to meet the steep expectations of current gens. And that doesn’t come cheap. James R. Coggins outlines the political game played by federal and municipal politicians that’s seeing tens of billions of dollars being shovelled into city coffers for lavish urban transit schemes, while country dwellers pay part of the freight and receive little but neglect and carbon taxes in return.

The Laurentian “Elite”: Canada’s ruling class

The causes and state of relations between Western and Central Canada are usually viewed through a political, economic, fiscal, geographic or at times demographic lens. Less common is looking at who rules, why, what they have done and what they are like. That would be the “Laurentian Elite”. Despite its profound role in shaping Canada, discussing it still seems mainly to interest political junkies. As a proud and concerned Westerner who grew up and was educated amidst the Laurentian Elite only to escape its clutches, John Weissenberger rips away the veil and deconstructs what he regards as this decaying class.

The Return of the Alberta Agenda

What’s old is new again, and that extends well beyond aviator shades and flat-billed caps into the political realm. New again and, sometimes, even more urgent than the first time. The federal votes had barely been counted last month before calls erupted to dust off the Alberta Agenda, aka, the “Firewall Letter” of 2001. Some see its measures as forming Alberta’s first big step towards independence; others hope the same policies would help douse separatist flames. Just as quickly, opponents confidently pronounced all of the Agenda’s items unworkable. Tom Flanagan, co-author of the original Alberta Agenda, reviews its five policy recommendations and evaluates their merits in the light of current circumstances.

Play Video

video

When an out-of-control wildfire threatens everything you hold dear and public officials order you to flee because, they claim, there’s nothing anyone can do − what’s your response? Do you meekly submit? Or do you call you neighbours and try to protect what’s yours? And when politicians publicly denounce you, officials callously demand your dental records so they can identify your charred remains afterwards, police threaten to take away your children and then try to starve your whole community into submission – what then?

the

Ask

C2C Journal is a donor-supported publication. If you enjoy what you read here please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help us create more and better content. Fake news is free. Real, reliable, fair journalism costs money.

Trending

Hot Reads

Too Much of Something

Last month saw yet another CD/Album release from Bob Dylan’s back catalogue, this one entitled Travelling Thru: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15. Even hard-core Dylan fans might be forgiven for despairing at this tsunami of outtakes, alternate versions, live versions, alternate live versions, and shoulda’-been-left-on-the-cutting-room-floor versions. Still, Dylan’s lyrics have universal appeal, as A.M. Juster finds in reflecting on the kid from Hibbing, Minnesota’s Nobel Prize.

First Nations, Suicide and Canadian Apartheid

The Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation in Saskatchewan is in crisis after a sixth young person tried to end their own life. Community leaders are overwhelmed. In There is No Difference, Peter Best argues against the racially divisive policies of the reserve system. He wants First Nations to join our 21st-century Canadian family based on full equality of rights – and responsibilities.

Ladies and Gents

One of Justin Trudeau’s cabinet stars is Chrystia Freeland, the new intergovernmental affairs minister and deputy prime minister. Originally from Alberta, Freeland follows on the path originally trod by Louise McKinney, who in being elected to the Alberta legislature in 1917 became the first woman elected to sit as a member of a parliament anywhere in the British Empire. We wish her well for, as Tasha Kheiriddin shows in this detailed case study, Canadians need the best politicians of both sexes.

Too Much of Something

Last month saw yet another CD/Album release from Bob Dylan’s back catalogue, this one entitled Travelling Thru: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15. Even hard-core Dylan fans might be forgiven for despairing at this tsunami of outtakes, alternate versions, live versions, alternate live versions, and shoulda’-been-left-on-the-cutting-room-floor versions. Still, Dylan’s lyrics have universal appeal, as A.M. Juster finds in reflecting on the kid from Hibbing, Minnesota’s Nobel Prize.

First Nations, Suicide and Canadian Apartheid

The Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation in Saskatchewan is in crisis after a sixth young person tried to end their own life. Community leaders are overwhelmed. In There is No Difference, Peter Best argues against the racially divisive policies of the reserve system. He wants First Nations to join our 21st-century Canadian family based on full equality of rights – and responsibilities.

Ladies and Gents

One of Justin Trudeau’s cabinet stars is Chrystia Freeland, the new intergovernmental affairs minister and deputy prime minister. Originally from Alberta, Freeland follows on the path originally trod by Louise McKinney, who in being elected to the Alberta legislature in 1917 became the first woman elected to sit as a member of a parliament anywhere in the British Empire. We wish her well for, as Tasha Kheiriddin shows in this detailed case study, Canadians need the best politicians of both sexes.

Search