Author: Kathleen Welsch

Welcome to Hotel Canada

Few politicians have ventured as far down the postmodern path as Justin Trudeau who famously proclaimed that Canada was a “postnational” nation, with no “core

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Not the Right Kind of Muslim

Political parties require talented and accomplished candidates. Why then did the Conservative Party of Canada disallow Salim Mansur to represent the party in London North Centre? Mansur is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Western Ontario, a newspaper columnist, a full-throated opponent of radical Islam, and a devout Muslim. Writing in the Post Millennial, Cosmin Dzsurdza unpacks the timorous thinking behind the party leadership’s decision and tells why ditching Mansur bodes ill for the upcoming election and future recruitment of Conservative candidates.

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Too Much of a Good Thing: A Cautionary Tale

Among the arguments for legalizing marijuana is that the black market for pot will disappear, thereby ending a destructive battle in the war on drugs and conserving valuable police resources. In Oregon, however, pot’s oversupply has delivered the opposite: a thriving underground market forcing legal growers to compete with cartels and illegal grow-ops, with everyone scrambling to move product in a saturated market. In City Journal, Steven Malanga examines some of the unintended consequences of Oregon’s liberalized pot laws. Should Canadian authorities expect the same?

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The New Age of Old Superstitions

G.K. Chesterton famously proclaimed, “When men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then become capable of believing in anything.” More recently, Jordan Peterson suggested, “If people think they are atheistic, it means they are unconscious of their Gods.” Tara Isabella Burton, writing in The American Interest, examines the spiritual and metaphysical beliefs of secular progressives. God may be dead for many of our social justice warriors, but psychics and astrologers, witches and demons, stars and signs and the casting of spells and hexes, are experiencing a renaissance.

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The Ascent of Media and the Death of Journalism

According to the American classicist and commentator Victor Davis Hanson, the disinterested reporting of events – what previous generations called “journalism” — is no longer practiced in the United States. Instead, we now have something called the “media” consisting of wannabe celebrities who “espouse opinions on nearly everything while knowing almost nothing.” Such “journalists” labour under shrunken vocabularies but possess enormous self-regard such that “most could give an in-depth lecture on Botox, but are ignorant about the U.S. Constitution or basic facts of American history.” Readers can judge for themselves how close the parallels – or how sharp the divide – may be with Canadian journalism.

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The Tucker Carlson Phenomenon

In his prophetic 1995 book The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy, historian Christopher Lasch argued that America’s professional and managerial elites had abandoned the middle classes, isolating themselves in enclaves of privilege. By last year, Fox News’ commentator Tucker Carlson had found the phenomenon so far advanced that, as he wrote in his book Ship of Fools, “Trump’s election wasn’t about Trump. It was a throbbing middle finger in the face of America’s ruling class.” In the Claremont Review of Books, Michael Anton examines the Tucker Carlson phenomenon, and why many now consider him the “de facto leader of the conservative movement.”

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The Changing Demographics of American Cities

Among the crowded field of contenders for the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee are four big-city mayors. Yet such candidates have little chance, in part because American cities are suffering from a myriad of afflictions, including gross income inequalities, which are driving out middle-class and working-class families. In a recent study, not one construction worker could afford a median-priced house in Los Angeles, San Francisco, or surrounding areas. In an essay with distinct overtones for Canadian big-city politics, Joel Kotkin argues in City Journal that for cities to remain emblematic of society, they need to attract and nurture the middle-class.

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Don’t Let Students Run the Universities

The recent disinviting of U.S. public intellectual Harvey Mansfield at Montréal’s Concordia University underscores the threat to free discussion in our universities. Among the reasons for the closing of the campus mind is the widespread adoption of the therapeutic model of education, which prioritizes the happiness and feelings of students. Little wonder, writes Tom Nicholls in The Atlantic, that the students have decided they’re in charge.

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