Law & Liberty
In Law & Liberty, James M. Patterson lays out why the disappearance of self-government and effective institutions has cleaved a fundamental disconnect between millions of citizens and the country they were raised to believe in.
Law & Liberty
In Law & Liberty, James M. Patterson lays out why the disappearance of self-government and effective institutions has cleaved a fundamental disconnect between millions of citizens and the country they were raised to believe in.
Common Sense
Leighton Woodhouse in Common Sense discusses the successful demands for San Francisco’s new law-and-order mayor to apologize for pointing out a dominant nationality among the city’s drug dealers. In the name of calling out racial injustice, the critics of mayor London Breed – a black female – lumped together career criminals with their working-class ethnic counterparts.
American Greatness
Today’s totalitarians avidly exploit humanity’s innate fear of loneliness to weaponize mobs in service to their ends, argues Stella Morabito in American Greatness. Morabito’s detailed account of what makes and motivates a mob illustrates today’s radical puppeteering.
Spectator World
Spectator World, Jeff Fynn-Paul takes to task the wildly popular hetero-white-males-ruin-everything interpretation of history and pleads for reason before this narrative of perpetual victimhood vs. oppressor, and utterly misguided understanding of the past, tears apart society’s already fraying fabric.
The Dispatcher
Michael L. Sena in The Dispatcher issues an eerie warning to governments planning to ban internal combustion engines to “save the environment.” Sena predicts that whether anybody in Western countries actually gets to drive will soon be up to the Communist Party of China, which controls the supply chain serving the heart of all EVs – their batteries. Editor’s note: The article begins on page 2.
Spectator World
Drawing upon emerging voting trends and new polling data, Patrick Ruffini in Spectator World paints similarities between today’s American Hispanic voter and the 1960s white Catholic voter to assess the creaky backbone of the Democratic Party’s support. His thesis will be tested in just weeks when the U.S. Midterm elections are held.
Unherd
Nathan Levine in UnHerd sheds light on China’s increasingly strained relationship with Russia. While aligned with Moscow’s anti-western urges, Chinese patience with the Russian invasion of Ukraine is wearing thin as its own economic worries rise to the fore. “The war is increasingly turning into a diplomatic disaster for Beijing,” writes Levine.
Spiked
Britain’s new prime minister Liz Truss has big problems. In failing to seize on middle-class populist sentiments unleashed by Brexit, writes Tim Black in Spiked, she is continuing the long, slow decline of the Conservative Party in the UK. “A chance to make Britain anew democratically, economically and culturally has been squandered,” Black observes.
City Journal
An obsession with race and reparations has infected the health care system across the border. Writing in City Journal, Heather Mac Donald pulls back the curtain on how the American medical profession’s fixation on social justice is undermining the quality of medical education, skewing research agendas and producing worse outcomes for patients.
The Spectator
With Vladimir Putin’s military adventure in Ukraine going poorly, the recent mass mobilization of young men has sent Russians fleeing the motherland for safer havens. The Spectator UK’s John Lloyd talks to two members of an earlier Russian diaspora for their take on “the many tragedies of Russia.”
City Journal
After two years of school closures, onerous and ineffective vaccine mandates, and the spread of ideologically-motivated curricula, parents and legislatures across the U.S. have had enough. Writing in City Journal, Steven Malanga takes a close look at the school-choice boom and what it holds for the future of education.
Unherd
Aris Roussinos argues in UnHerd that the tenuous and uncertain state of many European countries is their own fault. An excess of faith in the security provided by their own virtue has placed the entire continent on precarious footing. “Europe must reclaim the language of power,” he writes.
Law and Liberty
Reviewing the new book, The Rise of the New Puritans, for Law & Liberty, Daniel N. Gullotta considers the evidence linking today’s online woke scolds with their predecessors from The Scarlet Letter days. “Examples of this new Puritanism…are as frightening as they are funny, and troublingly frequent,” he reports.
Unherd
Rosie Gray investigates Gen Z’s surprising infatuation with Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and his Luddite, anti-technology ideology. “Surrounded by screens from early childhood, addicted to near-constant media consumption, often lacking basic in-person social skills, many sense a broader problem in their own individual capture by the tech borg,” she writes.
The Critic
“What was it about her?” Many have asked themselves that question in the days following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Sebastian Milbank reflects in The Critic on the carefully curated role played by her family in modern Britain; one that now appears invulnerable because, rather than in spite, of its own powerlessness.
Law and Liberty
Allowing a society and its citizens to live life with the most meaning and purpose requires a fusion of the best elements of classical liberalism and religious conservatism, argue Daniel Klein and Daniel J. Mahoney in Law & Liberty. The spirit of liberty and the spirit of religion, they propose, “stand or fall together.”
City Journal
Kay S. Hymowitz argues the American education establishment’s efforts at indoctrinating school children as antiracists is predicated on more than one falsehood. Writing in City Journal, Hymowitz explains how promoting this questionable content overlooks a much more real and consequential fate plaguing non-white students: they can’t read.
Unherd
Thomas Fazi in UnHerd chronicles the puzzlingly opaque journey of the lab-leak theory from forbidden topic to plausible discussion point and back again. Fazi points fingers at both the Chinese and American governments for stalling (for different reasons) on a much-needed independent inquiry into the origin of Covid-19.
The Critic
In The Critic, Emma Webb interviews a Pakistani couple acquitted of “blasphemy” – i.e., insulting Islam – but still forced to flee their home country. Webb’s daring account chronicles the underreported attacks on Christians in multiple countries outside the Western world, where religious strictures threaten not only free speech and social choices but life itself.
American Greatness
Victor Davis Hanson observes Middle America’s past-boiling-point attitude toward the self-entitled power of elite money, certifications, degrees and virtue signalling. Ordinary people, Hanson observes in American Greatness, have seen through the charade over the past decade as the elites comprehensively shredded their own aura of competence. Symbiotic coexistence is gone, replaced by mutual contempt.
City Journal
What happens when one slams an opponent’s terrible policy, campaigns to repeal it instantly and then watches as it helps taxpayers and the economy? Nothing. Michael Lucci in City Journal describes the limitless but, for once, beneficial hypocrisy and cynicism of Joe Biden and the Democrats in maintaining Trump-era tax cuts.
Quillette
Writing in Quillete, Stephen Martin Fritz and Denise Morel reflect on the underlying moral differences between liberal and conservative ideologies, shedding light on their historically established polarity and trying to predict the attitudes of future generations. How will our children judge us?
Unherd
While countries often criticize China’s increasingly aggressive actions towards Taiwan, none questions the Communist regime’s insistence that Taiwan is integral to China. But is it? Bill Hayton in Unherd revisits the essential premise of China’s claim on Taiwan. His examination of historical facts paints a unique and surprising portrait of an embattled island people.
Frontpage Mag
Reviewing some of the horrific consequences of the Biden Administration’s policies, David Horowitz in Frontpage Mag traces the causes to an unrestrained woke leftism that is no longer about particular issues or policies but has become a morally unhinged crusade to win at any and all costs – depraved, in Horowitz’s view. The lessons for other countries seem clear enough.
Quillette
As critical race theory continues to play out in schools across North America, Shane Trotter in Quillette reviews a recent book by an American teacher who contends that the increasing anxiety, depression and social apathy seen in failing schools are rooted in even deeper sources than today’s ideological movements.
Unherd
Seeing similarities to Vladimir Putin’s distorted rhetoric in his lead-up to the invasion of Ukraine, Bill Hayton in Unherd writes how Xi Jinping is using his own erroneous revisionist history to justify imperialistic territorial ambitions that could plunge a vital – and peace-loving – trading region of the world into conflict.
Law and Liberty
John O. McGinnis in Law and Liberty evaluates the “Defund the Police” movement’s equally destructive and fanciful younger sibling now taking hold in legal academia: abolishing prisons. McGinnis urges caution as the left-leaning academic establishment propounds short-sighted ideas that may leak out into the activist world.
Spiked
Brendan O’Neill in Spiked discusses the new front in the under-reported – and largely artificial – threat to the global food supply: restricting farmers’ access to fertilizer. O’Neill criticizes an accelerating government crusade that, in the name of a greener future, can only lead to less food production.
City Journal
In City Journal, Naomi Schaefer Riley makes the case for use of big data by welfare agencies to better flag potential children at risk. She cites numerous agency failures (often due to paralysis over racial politics) that could have been avoided while still preventing Minority Report-like outcomes.
American Greatness
John Agresto in American Greatness illuminates the academic left’s attack not only on the great works of Western civilization – the “high” – but on the “ordinary” habits, ideas and institutions that enable countries to prosper, society to function, regular people to live their lives, and civilization itself to go on.
The American Spectator
As the U.S. midterm election season commences, inflation is obviously front and centre, but Irit Tratt argues in the American Spectator that voters’ motivations may go far deeper. According to Tratt, Republicans in Arizona, Florida, West Virginia and 15 other states have made meaningful strides by championing choice in education, reflecting the gathering grassroots backlash against critical race theory, trans indoctrination and incompetent public schooling.