The Observer
In Ontario Gurratan Singh, brother of federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, has introduced legislation condemning the government of India for acts of “genocide” against the Sikhs. Concordia Professor Frank Chalk argues that while what happened to Sikhs was tragic, it fails to meet the definition of genocide. Tom Blackwell reports in The Observer.
The Observer
In Ontario Gurratan Singh, brother of federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, has introduced legislation condemning the government of India for acts of “genocide” against the Sikhs. Concordia Professor Frank Chalk argues that while what happened to Sikhs was tragic, it fails to meet the definition of genocide. Tom Blackwell reports in The Observer.
  • March 18, 2020
Hoover Institution
There’s an avalanche of apocalyptic predictions regarding the global march of the Wuhan coronavirus. Nor are conspiracy theories hard to find. Richard Epstein charts a stubbornly independent but intellectually rigorous middle path in arguing that the dire predictions ignore key aspects of viral epidemiology. Writing on the Hoover Institution’s website, Epstein’s pandemic scenario is serious – but hopeful.
  • March 18, 2020
The Pipeline
A hallmark of a scientific theory is its predictive power. Despite numerous failed predictions of climate catastrophe, dissent from the orthodoxy that humanity drives climate change remains off-limits. Mark Mendlovitz, writing in The Pipeline, coolly sets out the case that the main threat to climate hysteria is dispassionate analysis of the actual scientific data.
  • February 6, 2020
Spiked
Britain’s EU-exit succeeded despite the near-unanimous opposition of the chattering classes. To Brendan O’Neill, writing in Spiked, one of our age’s peculiarities is that a small and unrepresentative elite dictates a self-serving moral and intellectual narrative. For O’Neill, Brexit is a heartening victory in the war against the managerialism that defines our times.
  • February 6, 2020
Claremont Review of Books
In his new book, Comprehensive Judgement and Absolute Selfishness, the University of Lethbridge’s John Van Heyking argues that the key to Churchill’s political success was his ability to build strong, long-lasting friendships. Writing in The Claremont Review of Books, Michael Taube suggests this well-written tome adds another dimension to a masterful political leader.
  • February 6, 2020
National Review
Of all the unfriendly spirits haunting the American Democratic Party, none is more pernicious than Hillary Clinton. National Review’s Kyle Smith endures the new four-hour visual apologia Hillary and concludes the failed presidential candidate lives in a delusional bubble where all her troubles are the fault of others.
  • January 24, 2020
Gatestone Institute
The Muslim theocracy established through Iran’s 1979 revolution has demonized women since its inception, subjecting them to constant humiliations, such as prohibiting being in public uncovered. Giulio Meotti contends that the assassination of the terrorist General Soleimani has mobilized Iranian women, who are now demanding their freedoms.
  • January 24, 2020
City Journal
The death of Sir Roger Scruton has deprived the Anglosphere of one of its most accomplished public intellectuals. Scruton is inevitably described as a “conservative philosopher,” but he was also an accomplished musician, novelist and connoisseur of wine. Theodore Dalrymple, writing in City Journal, provides an overview of an astonishing career and a life well-lived.
  • January 24, 2020
The Critic
In the 1960s, America’s elite began repudiating the legitimacy of an overarching American national narrative by promoting racial, ethnic, and cultural identities. In his new book, Rich Lowry argues for the virtues of nationalism, maintaining that culture, language, and shared memories are the precondition of diverse groups living together as citizens.
  • January 12, 2020
RealClear Politics
Time magazine naming Greta Thunberg its “Person of the Year” struck many as absurd. “There is no one more privileged than the white girl refusing to go to school until literally everyone on earth changes the weather for her,” one writer tweeted. David Harsanyi, writing in The Federalist, argues that Thunberg’s media canonization is a perfect expression of a deeply unserious time.
  • January 12, 2020
Sp!ked
Censorship is a constant of history, and every age spews forth squads who stand ready to rectify our errors of thinking – always in the name of a greater good. Frank Furedi, writing in Spiked, tells how “white supremacy” has been transformed into an all-purpose term used to pathologize white people and discredit some of human civilization’s most important legacies.
  • January 12, 2020
The Spectator
The good news about the environment rarely makes the headlines. Despite the lamentations of environmental extremists like “Extinction Rebellion,” the science tells a very different story. Matt Ridley, writing in The Spectator UK, argues that we have rarely been in better shape and that environmental and technological trends are pointing in the right direction.
  • December 17, 2019
New York Magazine
Boris Johnson’s victory in last week’s UK election heralds a historic realignment in British politics. Writing in The New York Intelligencer, Andrew Sullivan argues that while Johnson appealed to similar populist forces as Donald Trump, Johnson unveiled a fresh formula for the political success of right-of-centre parties: make no apologies for your own country and culture.
  • December 17, 2019
MIddle East Forum
The vulnerabilities of Canada’s asylum laws were made evident when Abdulahi Hasan Sharif conducted a terrorist attack in Edmonton (the Somali was sentenced last week). Simply asking for asylum at the border of most Western countries sets in motion a process that can take years. Todd Bensam reports on how a broken asylum system facilitates the movement and planning of Islamist terrorists.
  • December 9, 2019
City Journal
China accounts for about one-third of Australia’s trade and Chinese influence in Oz has intensified. While U.S. resistance to Chinese expansionism is intensifying, Australia is far more vulnerable to the Communist regime’s efforts to shape its economy, cities, and political system. As Joel Kotkin reports, Aussies are becoming alarmed.
  • November 27, 2019
American Greatness
In his runaway best-seller The Plot Against the President, Lee Smith tells how Washington’s permanent bureaucracy, Deep State actors and news media accomplices targeted Donald Trump. The Trump-hating mob was willing to go after virtually any person who had the temerity to back Trump but, in Republican Congressman Devin Nunes, might just have met its match.
  • November 27, 2019
Spectator USA
Why is it that Americans have, in recent years, witnessed so many senseless mass murders? Increasing evidence points to a direct link between long-term marijuana use and violent crimes. Peter Hitchens argues that marijuana’s depiction as a “soft” drug has been one of the slickest PR campaigns in history.
  • November 13, 2019
American Greatness
For the past fifty years, the left has steamrolled workplaces, schools and places of worship in the name of progressive ideology. Mark Bauerlein argues that conservatives are finally waking up to the nature of their opponents and the ultimate stakes in the culture wars. It is time, he says, for conservatives to assume a fighting stance.
  • November 13, 2019
Melanie Phillips
We are all troubled by the exploitation of children. Why is it, then, that children are so often used to promote political or environmental causes, the complexity of which no child could grasp? Melanie Phillips argues that the weaponization of children has become an appalling feature of contemporary political debate.
  • November 13, 2019
Notes on Liberty
One of the abiding myths of the Second World War is the technological superiority of German armaments, particularly its tanks and rockets. Yet as Kevin Kallmes points out, the Nazi vision of a hi-tech war machine powered by a vast industrial empire and destined for world domination was a fatal delusion, and one which bore little relation to reality.
  • November 4, 2019
City Journal
Science is based on skepticism, the demand that ideas be subjected to rigorous tests. Yet skepticism is notably absent from the climate change debate. Guy Sorkin, writing in City Journal, speaks to climatologist Judith Curry, who contends that “politics, money and fame” have corrupted climate science such that “independence of mind and climatology have become incompatible.”
  • November 4, 2019
The Atlantic
The eminent American literary critic and professor Harold Bloom died on October 14. The ardent defender of the Western Canon warned that making literature subordinate to social justice – or any external cause — destroys intellectual and aesthetic standards. Writing in The Atlantic, Stanley Fish summarizes Bloom’s career, reminding us what we’ll lose by politicizing literary culture.
  • November 4, 2019
The American Mind
The noxious politics that vilifies and condemns all males as sexual oppressors has young men surreptitiously seeking alternatives. An anonymous manifesto known as Bronze Age Mindset is ripping through this cohort by rejecting the ideology of “toxic masculinity” and celebrating the masculine virtues. Still, warns Spencer Klavan, it espouses a dangerous doctrine rather than an ennobling philosophy.
  • October 15, 2019
New English Review
The Swedish climate activist and perpetually-angry teenager Greta Thunberg has announced that’s she’s going to Alberta where, no doubt, she will deliver a stern lecture. Theodore Dalrymple, writing in The New English Review, argues that Greta’s transformation into a celebrity is the work of infantile adults who have turned her into the Ayatollah Thunberg, the Khomeini of climate change.
  • October 15, 2019
Competitive Enterprise Institute
Back in 1841, Charles Mackay noted in Extraordinary Popular Delusions and The Madness of Crowds that crowds are swayed not by facts but “emotional feedback loops” that confirm their delusion. He was onto something. Myron Ebell and Steven J. Milloy survey the past 50 years of scientifically predicted environmental apocalypses – none of which has materialized.
  • October 15, 2019
Spectator USA
Britain’s large appetite for American imports has its limits. Writing in the inaugural issue of The Spectator, U.S.A, Rod Liddle pleads with America to take back Prince Harry’s wife, Meghan Markle. For Mr. Liddle, the departure of the virtue-signalling, sanctimonious Duchess of Sussex can’t come soon enough.
  • September 27, 2019
Spectator USA
Wordsworth never met Greta Thunberg. Greta is 16 years old, possessed of the moral certitude of youth, and convinced that the world is ending soon. She is the self-anointed Cassandra to a cold and uncaring world. Parents of teenagers will recognize the animating themes of her recent speech at the UN: adults are stupid, materialistic and greedy, and their thoughtlessness is causing me great distress. Writing in the Spectator, USA, Dominic Green casts a gimlet eye over the culture which produced this “pig-tailed prophet of planetary doom”.
  • September 27, 2019
The Atlantic
China has become the worlds’ largest and most important movie market and Hollywood is anxious to cash in. Yet heavy-handed censorship from Chinese authorities reveals a harsh truth: the ideology promulgated by the Chinese Communist Party subverts bedrock Western ideals, including the rule of law, respect for private property and, above all, freedom of expression. Martha Bayles, writing in The Atlantic, scrutinizes the long arm of Chinese censorship and American filmmakers’ craven submission in the pursuit of profits. What ultimately is at stake, writes Bayles, is nothing less than artistic freedom.
  • September 27, 2019
The Spectator
What’s a climate obsessive to do when the data suggested wildfires worldwide are declining? Or when the Earth’s forested areas are increasing? Or when the rising productivity of agriculture and increasing crop yields mean we now need less land to feed more people, and so are sparing massive amounts of wild land? For climate alarmists the answer is obvious: ramp up the rhetoric and recruit some celebrities. Matt Ridley, writing in The Spectator, argues that the recent preening and preaching prompted by the Amazon fires was primarily an attempt to garner attention in a competitive media market.
  • September 7, 2019
City Journal
Few intellectuals can match the extraordinary popular success of Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari. In two best-selling books, Sapiens and Homo Deus, he tackles the big questions about the human condition and its future. Harari’s wide-ranging, macro-histories have clearly struck a nerve with the public. Yet his account of our collective past assumes that the biological, scientific version of human nature provides the true and full explanation of what we are. Writing in City Journal, Sir Roger Scruton notes that Harari’s reductive view of history skirts the rather gaping matters of human self-consciousness and self-awareness. In the end, writes Scruton, Harari’s histories are about homo without the sapiens.
  • September 7, 2019
Commentary
The renowned Canadian physician Sir William Osler once observed that “the greater the ignorance, the greater the dogmatism.” No issue fits Osler’s words better than climate change. Contrary to global dogma, climate science is far from settled. Among the basic challenges facing climatologists is securing accurate records of the Earth’s temperature. John Steele Gordon, writing in Commentary, reports that when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration installed 114 state-of-the-art weather stations in 2005, it didn’t quite confirm global warming. As Mark Twain summarized, “Climate is what we expect, weather is what we get.”