City Journal
In City Journal, Heather MacDonald comments on U.S. President Joe Biden’s embarrassing stumbles during the recent Presidential debate with challenger Donald Trump. MacDonald details Biden’s steep mental decline, the hypocrisy of news outlets attempting to deflect the truth about Biden’s state and the growing strength of Trump’s campaign.
City Journal
In City Journal, Heather MacDonald comments on U.S. President Joe Biden’s embarrassing stumbles during the recent Presidential debate with challenger Donald Trump. MacDonald details Biden’s steep mental decline, the hypocrisy of news outlets attempting to deflect the truth about Biden’s state and the growing strength of Trump’s campaign.
The Blade of Perseus
Victor Davis Hanson in The Blade of Perseus explains the self-destructive approach U.S. President Joe Biden has taken in governing America. Hanson details how running the country into unrepayable US$36 trillion debt and causing unmanageable inflation will serve to harm a future Republican government, forcing it to adopt tough – and unpopular – remedies.
City Journal
In City Journal, Christopher Rufo outlines how the ideology of “diversity, equity, and inclusion” (DEI) means, intends and delivers the very opposite of its stated purpose. Noting that this way of thinking has spread throughout universities, Rufo explains how DEI is destroying the social compact that long defined the citizenry’s relationship with higher education institutions.
Spiked
In Spiked, James Heartfield recounts the history of Israel, the origins of Hamas, and why Palestinians decided to pursue a path of bloodshed. He describes Hamas’ charter and its lust for blood justified by “divine law”. Heartfield outlines how Hamas’ insatiable religious and territorial aspirations will perpetuate conflict until the terrorist group is finally stopped.
The American Mind
The blind partisan rage stoked against former U.S. President Donald Trump will have serious consequences, argues Carson Holloway in The American Mind. The legal immunity normally granted to American presidents, Holloway notes, serves a purpose: not to put the individual in question above the law, but to promote moderate and orderly politics between the two American parties.
City Journal
In City Journal, Eitan Fischberger reports on the alarming number of Hamas terrorists who simultaneously work as “journalists”. This advances Hamas’ strategy of shaping the global narrative by using Western news media as disseminators of its propaganda. Policymakers and media outlets, Fischberger warns, would do well to apply skepticism towards any report emanating from Gaza.
The European Conservative
Rod Dreher reflects in The European Conservative on disintegrating social cohesion throughout Western civilization. The rise of secularism, Dreher argues, has left people with no motivation to live for anyone/anything except themselves. Bereft of any rationale for self-sacrifice, he concludes, we are left with a civilization no one is willing to die for.
UnHerd
In UnHerd, Martin Gurri examines the severe double standard in the U.S. legal system that he feels explains former President Donald Trump’s recent felony conviction in New York. Both Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden, Gurri asserts, seriously violated the law on multiple occasions and got off scot-free. This outrageous double standard, he writes, has serious implications for the principle of equality before the law.
The European Conservative
Thomas O’Reilly in The European Conservative reports on the growing momentum of farmers from across Europe in protesting the EU’s technocracy, “Green Deal” overregulation and cheap agricultural imports – which are all devastating Europe’s food producers. O’Reilly’s on-the-scene observations of well-meaning farmers fighting for their livelihood don’t square with the media’s portrayal of them as right-wing extremists.
City Journal
Eithan Haim in City Journal examines leaked files from the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). The files display the stark contrast between WPATH members’ frank internal exchanges about the harms inflicted by early transgender treatment and the group’s outward doublespeak. Allowing gender ideology to override their professional judgment, Haim argues, reveals WPATH members as “charlatans of the highest order”.
First Things
In First Things, Simone Rizkallah recounts the story of how her great-grandparents narrowly escaped the Armenian Genocide. She notes how indifferent the world was to this severe injustice committed by Ottoman Turkey and how today’s growth of hostile Islamism and violent pro-Hamas demonstrations are being met with the same apathy.
Law & Liberty
Thomas Savidge in Law & Liberty explains how the U.S. Social Security and Medicare programs are expected to exhaust their reserves in the coming decade while facing tens of trillions of dollars in unfunded future obligations. Savidge warns how a combination of declining birth rates and mismanaged government spending is leading down a path to bankruptcy.
City Journal
In City Journal, Christopher F. Rufo details the growing ideological warfare taking place on American campuses, particularly at Columbia University. With anti-Semitism on the rise and pro-Hamas sentiments taking root, Rufo explains how postcolonial theory and the glorification of student activism are poisoning the minds of university students.
Reason
Stewart Baker in Reason details how a quiet bipartisan “privacy” bill aims to upend the United States Supreme Court’s prohibition of race-based university admissions. Recently introduced as the American Privacy Rights Act of 2024 (APRA), the bill suggests using a “disparate impact” test that, by its nature, finds discriminatory disparities everywhere, in turn justifying racial and gender quotas.
Gatestone Institute
Writing in the Gatestone Institute, Con Coughlin maps out the modern-day “Scramble for Africa”. Centred in war-torn Sudan, countries including Iran, China and most recently Russia have all expanded their involvement. Russia’s objective in providing arms, suggests Coughlin, is acquiring a strategic Russian naval base in Port Sudan.
Jewish World Review
No longer reminding public officials that they are being watched, judged and held to a high standard, the Washington Post has taken a different approach, writes Jeff Jacoby in the Jewish World Review. Unlike the New York Times, the Post has decided to openly proclaim its preferred presidential horse and to work hard to pull him around the electoral racetrack.
The Spectator
In The Spectator, Matthew Lynn examines the first quarterly budget surplus that Argentina has posted since 2008. President Javier Milei – who campaigned with a chainsaw to symbolize his financial plans – appears to be weathering the expectedly fierce resistance to his cost-cutting shock therapy. Lynn looks at how Milei got this far and suggests two lessons for governments hoping to replicate his success.
Law & Liberty
Law & Liberty republishes a speech in which former Indiana governor and Purdue University President Mitch Daniels offers advice to students facing a world where individuals are crammed into identity groups and machines seemingly surpass the intellect and abilities of humans. Daniels borrows from Neil Armstrong in calling for graduates to constantly improve the one corner of the universe they can control: themselves.
The Blade of Perseus
Victor Davis Hanson reflects on the myths busted by the radical and at-times violent protests happening across North America. For too long, myths around elite education, anti-Israel vs. anti-Semitic, and pro-Palestinian vs. pro-Hamas (i.e., terrorist) were foisted on the American people by politicos and the media. Unmasking these myths, Hanson writes, opens a window into the left-wing Democratic base.
City Journal
In City Journal, Mark P. Mills reveals a future for renewable energy…one that depends on oil and natural gas. The narrow-minded “transitionist” rationale, he argues, overlooks the US$5 trillion price tag (in the U.S. alone), the shakeup to industry, mining constraints, the costly overbuild of backup generation, the false analogy of green energy’s scalability, the dubious development of battery storage – and the ultimate impotence of government-imposed “mandates”.
National Review
Jim Geraghty in National Review explains why anti-Semitic protesters are becoming more powerful than some U.S. university and college presidents. He submits it is a leadership crisis wherein those with a prestigious title and fancy office are terrified of making and enforcing decisions. Strong leadership, Geraghty ventures, can improve campuses, students – and protestors too.
The European Conservative
Charles A. Coulombe, in The European Conservative, reflects on common lies. Chief among them is that European civilization and the white race are responsible for all the evil that now exists. Coulombe profiles the deceitful narratives facing the world today and drives home the criticality of refuting those lies with vigour.
The Wall Street Journal
In The Wall Street Journal, Konrad Putzier details the City of St. Louis’s catastrophic “doom loop” of rising crime, fleeing businesses, emptying buildings and worsening decay. The once-vibrant central business district is largely boarded up and the city saw the steepest drop in foot traffic of 66 major North American cities. The halting half-measures Putzier reports on are almost certainly destined to fail.
Law & Liberty
David Krugler in Law & Liberty reviews the recent Steven Spielberg TV series Masters of the Air. The series unflinchingly, if a bit woodenly, portrays Second World War strategic bombing missions carried out by the U.S. Air Force (with a nod to Britain’s Royal Air Force), whose young aircrews withstood horrific casualties to carry on undaunted.
The Times of Israel
In The Times of Israel Cathryn J. Prince tells the story of Jewish authors as the Gaza war continues. When they aren’t confronted with outright hostility – like having their work pulled from prestigious journals – they are told their voices are unmarketable. The censorship and attack on their freedom of expression is felt globally, writes Prince, who urges Jewish writers to louden their voices.
New York Post
In the 1960s, people listened to Paul Ehrlich’s “Population Bomb” doomsaying and concluded it was bad for children to be born. Policymakers adopted population-trimming policies. But the 21st century is not turning out as expected. Global fertility is collapsing. Glenn H. Reynolds in the New York Post looks at what global population might do over the next century.
The Spectator
In The Spectator, Terry Barnes writes about the recent appointment of Australian Governor-General Samantha Mostyn. Westminster constitutional tradition requires a country’s head of state (as opposed to head of government) to be impartial and apolitical. But Mostyn’s appointment, writes Barnes, amounts to partisan infiltration of the constitutional monarchy – which will have serious implications in the next election.
The Gatestone Institute
Resurrecting the so-called “two-state solution” – i.e., Israel and a Palestinian state coexisting side-by-side – is the only way to create lasting peace, according to two-time U.S. ambassador to Israel, Martin Indyk. Writing for the Gatestone Institute, Michel Calvo uncovers the fatal problem that advocates like Indyk and President Joe Biden simply ignore while pushing this policy.
New York Post
Why do major corporations and institutions keep finding themselves in hot water after embracing absurd woke notions about gender and race? Glenn H. Reynolds of the New York Post sifts through numerous examples from brand names including Disney, Sports Illustrated, Planet Fitness, Budweiser and Harvard University in search of answers. His conclusion, “Our ruling class is kind of crazy.”
Tablet
Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer has demanded new elections in Israel, citing as his authority the fact he’s the “highest-ranking Jewish elected official in America ever.” Writing in Tablet, Elliott Abrams points out “Schumer is not the highest-ranking Jew ever to serve in the U.S. government, nor … the most powerful ever.” Plus, no amount of braggadocio can excuse “interference in the internal politics of a democratic ally.”
The European Conservative
In The European Conservative, Shawn Phillip Cooper laments recent moves to rewrite history and literature to satisfy current ideology. “Once history is destroyed, truth ceases to be a matter of conformity to objective facts,” he observes. To protect political rights and safeguard objectivity, Cooper promotes reliance on old-school physical media over their digital simulacrum. Libraries filled with dusty old books will keep us free!