National Affairs
Since the June 2007 introduction of the iPhone, scientific evidence has been mounting that we are suffering from an attenuated attention span while our ability to comprehend and use abstract reasoning is weakening. Writing in National Affairs, Adam Garfinkle argues that the loss of “deep literacy” has widespread neurophysiological costs.
National Affairs
Since the June 2007 introduction of the iPhone, scientific evidence has been mounting that we are suffering from an attenuated attention span while our ability to comprehend and use abstract reasoning is weakening. Writing in National Affairs, Adam Garfinkle argues that the loss of “deep literacy” has widespread neurophysiological costs.
  • May 8, 2020
Tablet Magazine
In his new history of Rome, Kyle Harper recounts how 6th-century Romans reeled before a new pathogen which wiped out 20-30 percent of the population. Edward N. Luttwak, reviewing The Fate of Rome in Tablet, praises Harper, who cites evidence pointing to Yersinia pestis, better known as the bubonic plague in its much later return as the “Black Death.”
  • May 8, 2020
American Greatness
To remove Donald Trump from office, the American media have abandoned their commitment to truth-telling. From “Russian collusion” to “the Mueller investigation” to the impeachment fiasco and the coronavirus, Victor Davis Hanson, writing in American Greatness, chronicles how his fellow-citizens have reacted to the years-long litany of error and falsehood.
  • April 30, 2020
American Greatness
When the Covid-19 virus first appeared and our knowledge of its lethality was limited, “sheltering in place” and closing our schools appeared to be rational safeguards. But for Roger Kimball, writing in American Greatness, the evidence is now clear. Far from being an existential emergency, the virus is just a vicissitude of life.
  • April 30, 2020
The Critic
The World Health Organization’s mandate is to shield us all from the spread of disease. Yet instead of alerting the world to the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been complicit in its spread. Kapil Komireddi, writing in The Critic, casts a gimlet eye at Tedros Ghebreyesus, the WHO’s Director-General, and his strange relationship with China.
  • April 30, 2020
Spectator USA
The outdoor transmission rate of the Covid-19 virus is practically nil. Yet as Heather MacDonald discovered, New Yorkers in Central Park are staying far apart. Writing in The Spectator USA, MacDonald concludes the public health establishment is determined to sustain the hysteria.
  • April 23, 2020
The Spectator
Much of medical science is an ongoing debate rather than a stock of unequivocal results. John Lee, writing in The Spectator, reminds us that medical experts can get things quite wrong. It is the job of politicians and civil servants, not scientists, to decide whether our response to the virus is proportionate and when to reopen the economy.
  • April 23, 2020
Issues & Insights
Since the AIDS epidemic of the early 1980s, epidemic modelling has generated dramatic numbers – often leading to widespread panic. But how reliable are they? Not very. Covid case and fatality projections have tumbled by orders of magnitude. This is nothing new, however. After so many failures, Michael Fumento argues in Issues and Insights, it’s time to ditch the models.
  • April 23, 2020
The Spectator
It appears the coronavirus is transphobic, homophobic, misogynistic and racist. Plus hateful towards immigrants. But the group with the most to fear are the obese. Writing in the Spectator USA, Chadwick Moore points out that fat people of all colours, races and sexualities need to be extra careful.
  • April 9, 2020
National Review
As the pandemic continues its global arc, the Chinese Communist Party is desperately trying to spin the narrative and hide its malfeasance. Jim Geraghty, writing in National Review, provides a detailed time-line of the corrupt oligarchy’s duplicity – on which the party’s emphatic insistence that human transmission was unproven is just one sorry example.
  • April 9, 2020
SPIKED
There’s almost universal agreement that virtually shutting down the economy, however painful, is necessary to stop the spread of the Wuhan virus. One of the few dissenting voices has been Peter Hitchens. In conversation with Spiked’s Brendan O’Neill, the British author questions whether the effects on society are in proportion to the problem.
  • April 9, 2020
The Federalist
Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw American funding from the WHO has triggered outrage from the usual quarters. Yet it’s known that the WHO initially ignored the advice of international experts, kow-towed to Beijing and published falsehoods. The editors of National Review say the U.S. needs to demand transparency about WHO’s dealings with China.
  • March 29, 2020
Spectator USA
Virtually shutting down the economy to stop the spread of the coronavirus has been widely accepted as harsh but necessary in many countries. But poverty too is a disease: once it infects, it spreads and it devastates lives. Heather MacDonald, writing in Spectator USA, assesses the costs of the metastasizing economic shutdown.
  • March 29, 2020
Spiked
G.K. Chesterton famously remarked, “When men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then become capable of believing in anything.” Brendan O’Neill, writing in Spiked, observes that for some environmentalists, COVID-19 is the handiwork of a sentient nature exacting vengeance on a civilization that’s a pox on the planet.
  • March 29, 2020
The Critic
The politics of left and right are rooted in two very different accounts of human nature. Conservatives adopt a tragic view of existence, while it is axiomatic for progressives that we are born intrinsically good and corrupted by society. David Starkey, writing in The Critic, argues that the principle of humankind’s inherent goodness is unsupported by the empirical facts.
  • March 18, 2020
Hoover Institution
There’s an avalanche of apocalyptic predictions regarding the global march of the Wuhan coronavirus. Nor are conspiracy theories hard to find. Richard Epstein charts a stubbornly independent but intellectually rigorous middle path in arguing that the dire predictions ignore key aspects of viral epidemiology. Writing on the Hoover Institution’s website, Epstein’s pandemic scenario is serious – but hopeful.
  • March 18, 2020
The Pipeline
A hallmark of a scientific theory is its predictive power. Despite numerous failed predictions of climate catastrophe, dissent from the orthodoxy that humanity drives climate change remains off-limits. Mark Mendlovitz, writing in The Pipeline, coolly sets out the case that the main threat to climate hysteria is dispassionate analysis of the actual scientific data.
  • March 18, 2020
The Observer
In Ontario Gurratan Singh, brother of federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, has introduced legislation condemning the government of India for acts of “genocide” against the Sikhs. Concordia Professor Frank Chalk argues that while what happened to Sikhs was tragic, it fails to meet the definition of genocide. Tom Blackwell reports in The Observer.
  • February 27, 2020
Law and Liberty
The political appeal of left-wing parties historically was the promise of a more equitable distribution of wealth. But the left’s obsession with multiculturalism and identity politics has caused it to abandon the working class. Law and Liberty’s Eric Kaufmann suggests why the left is unlikely to adapt to new electoral realities.
  • February 27, 2020
The Federalist
Why does modernist architecture produce so many soulless, ugly buildings? The answer lies with the early 20th-century rejection of objective truth and beauty, and the related dismissal of Greek and Roman traditions. President Donald Trump is considering an executive order favouring classical designs in all federal buildings. As Sumantra Maitha reports in The Federalist, this has drawn fierce opposition.
  • February 27, 2020
The Washington Post
We humans are rarely the best judge of our own affairs, which is why we have lawyers represent us in courts and seek other counsel in our personal lives. Distance brings perspective, and the same holds for nations. Writing in The Washington Post, J.J. McCullough wonders why Canada, one of the most successful nations in history, appears intent on dissolving itself.
  • February 6, 2020
Spiked
Britain’s EU-exit succeeded despite the near-unanimous opposition of the chattering classes. To Brendan O’Neill, writing in Spiked, one of our age’s peculiarities is that a small and unrepresentative elite dictates a self-serving moral and intellectual narrative. For O’Neill, Brexit is a heartening victory in the war against the managerialism that defines our times.
  • February 6, 2020
Claremont Review of Books
In his new book, Comprehensive Judgement and Absolute Selfishness, the University of Lethbridge’s John Van Heyking argues that the key to Churchill’s political success was his ability to build strong, long-lasting friendships. Writing in The Claremont Review of Books, Michael Taube suggests this well-written tome adds another dimension to a masterful political leader.
  • February 6, 2020
National Review
Of all the unfriendly spirits haunting the American Democratic Party, none is more pernicious than Hillary Clinton. National Review’s Kyle Smith endures the new four-hour visual apologia Hillary and concludes the failed presidential candidate lives in a delusional bubble where all her troubles are the fault of others.
  • January 24, 2020
Gatestone Institute
The Muslim theocracy established through Iran’s 1979 revolution has demonized women since its inception, subjecting them to constant humiliations, such as prohibiting being in public uncovered. Giulio Meotti contends that the assassination of the terrorist General Soleimani has mobilized Iranian women, who are now demanding their freedoms.
  • January 24, 2020
City Journal
The death of Sir Roger Scruton has deprived the Anglosphere of one of its most accomplished public intellectuals. Scruton is inevitably described as a “conservative philosopher,” but he was also an accomplished musician, novelist and connoisseur of wine. Theodore Dalrymple, writing in City Journal, provides an overview of an astonishing career and a life well-lived.
  • January 24, 2020
The Critic
In the 1960s, America’s elite began repudiating the legitimacy of an overarching American national narrative by promoting racial, ethnic, and cultural identities. In his new book, Rich Lowry argues for the virtues of nationalism, maintaining that culture, language, and shared memories are the precondition of diverse groups living together as citizens.
  • January 12, 2020
RealClear Politics
Time magazine naming Greta Thunberg its “Person of the Year” struck many as absurd. “There is no one more privileged than the white girl refusing to go to school until literally everyone on earth changes the weather for her,” one writer tweeted. David Harsanyi, writing in The Federalist, argues that Thunberg’s media canonization is a perfect expression of a deeply unserious time.
  • January 12, 2020
Sp!ked
Censorship is a constant of history, and every age spews forth squads who stand ready to rectify our errors of thinking – always in the name of a greater good. Frank Furedi, writing in Spiked, tells how “white supremacy” has been transformed into an all-purpose term used to pathologize white people and discredit some of human civilization’s most important legacies.
  • January 12, 2020
The Spectator
The good news about the environment rarely makes the headlines. Despite the lamentations of environmental extremists like “Extinction Rebellion,” the science tells a very different story. Matt Ridley, writing in The Spectator UK, argues that we have rarely been in better shape and that environmental and technological trends are pointing in the right direction.
  • December 17, 2019
New York Magazine
Boris Johnson’s victory in last week’s UK election heralds a historic realignment in British politics. Writing in The New York Intelligencer, Andrew Sullivan argues that while Johnson appealed to similar populist forces as Donald Trump, Johnson unveiled a fresh formula for the political success of right-of-centre parties: make no apologies for your own country and culture.