British Labour Tries a Reboot

Spectator UK
September 27, 2021

After a disastrous showing against Boris Johnson’s Conservatives in 2019, Britian’s Labour Party is remaking itself under new leader Keir Starmer, who just issued a lengthy statement of values that’s notable for its lack of hostility towards the private sector. The Spectator’s Isabel Hardman calls it a “beautifully written” essay that charts a “challenging new direction” for a party that recently lurched hard-left.

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