Amazonian Rhetoric

The Spectator
September 27, 2019

What’s a climate obsessive to do when the data suggested wildfires worldwide are declining? Or when the Earth’s forested areas are increasing? Or when the rising productivity of agriculture and increasing crop yields mean we now need less land to feed more people, and so are sparing massive amounts of wild land? For climate alarmists the answer is obvious: ramp up the rhetoric and recruit some celebrities. Matt Ridley, writing in The Spectator, argues that the recent preening and preaching prompted by the Amazon fires was primarily an attempt to garner attention in a competitive media market.

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